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2013

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2013-10 – Transaction Recovery

Transaction Recovery is a feature of Oracle database that allows DBAs to recover from transactions which have undesirable effects. Sometimes it happens that a transaction performs an undesirable effect, and we determine later that this transaction should not have been committed. In this case, we do not want to perform database point-in-time recovery as the rest of database is working fine. We only have a problem with one transaction. Oracle allows us to provide approximate times of the problematic transaction and search the archived and online redo log files for transactions performed during said time. Then we can identify the transaction and roll it back. Transaction recovery is very easy to use from Oracle Enterprise Manager, but it requires some setup to perform before we can use it.

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2013-09 – Pluggable Databases

This article will be discussing a new feature of Oracle 12c Database, the pluggable database, which builds on the container database concepts, found here. We will be discussing why it is needed, what it solves, its benefits and some examples of it.

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2013-08 – Container Databases

This article will be discussing a new feature of Oracle 12c Database, Oracle Multitenant Architecture, which enables an Oracle Database to act as multitenant Container Database (CDB). A CDB includes one or many pluggable databases (PDBs). One default PDB, the seed PDB, is provided by Oracle in every CDB. Users cannot make changes to the seed PDB, but user can create additional PDBs using this default PDB. A CDB can contain 253 PDBs.

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2013-07 – Oracle Database 12c

Oracle Corporation has released Database 12c for general availability this month. We’re busy geeking out on the new features like multi-tenancy, heat maps, etc. We’ll be back next month with blog posts about some new 12c features.

 

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2013-06 – PL/SQL Function Result Cache

The PL/SQL function result cache provides the mechanism for caching the results of PL/SQL functions in a shared global area (SGA), available to every session that runs on your database.

When a result-cached function is invoked, the system checks the cache. If the cache contains the result from a previous call to the function with the same parameter values, the system returns the cached result to the invoker and does not re-execute the function body.

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